New Student Experience Seminars
2021-2022

New Student Experience Seminars are offered fall, winter & spring quarters. Unlike FIGs, which are several courses grouped together, NSESs are stand-alone courses. Like FIGs, NSESs are smaller courses, which limit enrollment to 25 students. NSESs are special topics courses or community-engaged learning experiences that change quarterly. They're often only 1 or 2 credits, which makes them easy to fit into your schedule on top of 3 or 4 other classes. And they're taught by faculty who love working with first year students and make up our core first year faculty team. So, you could take a NSES multiple quarters in a row and work with the same faculty member. Or you could take a NSES just once if you're looking for more connection and sense of community with everything else that's part of your schedule. Or you could take a FIG in the fall, then enroll in a NSES winter and/or spring. Often students who take FIGs together like continuing on as a group, and taking a NSES is a great way to stick with your community from the fall.

Summer Quarter

Designing a Life You Love
Class: SMNR 385
CRN: 31167
Instructor: Molly Ware
Time: 4:00-5:50 PM

In times of so much uncertainty, isolation and information overload, we need new ways of navigating life outside of traditional approaches to planning for the future. In this course, we will explore content and practice skills that help you live life on purpose and design your life in ways that create a deep sense of meaning and fulfillment especially in times of transition (like graduation or your first years at college). Learn to stop going through the motions of life, stop playing by everyone else's rules and start creating the life you want even when you're not sure what that is or what step to take next. Find your way through the overwhelming array of choices with ease. And learn research-based practices for noticing and reducing stress so it stops driving your life making it hard to experience joy, connection, and satisfaction no matter what your life looks like in the moment. This course will be highly experiential and provide opportunities for you to immediately apply course principles to your life.


Fall Quarter

College & Creativity: Shaping Your Story w Flash Nonfiction
Class: Seminar 197B
CRN: CRN 44623
Instructor: Kaitlyn Teer
Time: MW 3:00-3:50 PM

Students in this seminar will explore creative writing and experiment with creative practices that will support them as they begin their college experience. With a special emphasis on short form nonfiction, we will analyze exemplary creative works, practice the fundamentals of writing craft, and engage in generative writing exercises and revision strategies. We will consider how creative writing relates to other genres of college writing. What does creative writing do—for writers, for readers, for the world as it is now, and as we imagine it could be? Students will produce a portfolio of creative work, participate in a community of writers, and in the process further develop their voice and perspective.


The System in Black and White
Class: Seminar 197B
CRN: CRN 44622
Instructor: Tania Douglas
Time: W 3:00-4:50 PM

A system is a living structure, something designed over time that shapes our ideas, perspectives, and expectations with the weight of perceived authority. At its core, a system is a set of beliefs. It can be broken, interrupted, or redesigned by society, because its existence is based on collective agreement. However, systems are also about power, which makes changing them a complex. In this course, we’ll explore society’s beliefs about race, gender, and identity through the systems that uphold them. We’ll study the nature of resistance as an intention to subvert, oppose, or change power relations between individuals and systems. We’ll examine historical and contemporary oppression, and the ideals of the resistance movements demanding change. This course will put a special emphasis on historical, contemporary and personal perspectives, inquiry questions and discussion, and research as a backdrop to students’ final project.


First Generation Pathways - College of Business & Economics
Class: Seminar 197B
CRN: CRN 44620
Instructor: Lucas Senger
Time: R 4:00-5:50 PM

This seminar is designed to help first generation students explore and understand the critical areas of focus for academic and personal well-being. We will develop an understanding of practical student life and academic skills, from the basics to the tips and resources that are most critical to student success. Students will be linked with College, University and personal resource providers that can support the unique challenges that first-generation students face. Students will be introduced to the distinct areas of study and professional practices that business has to offer. In this seminar we will meet and network with professionals and alumni who were also first generation students themselves.


Financial Literacy I
Class: Seminar 197B
CRN: CRN 44621
Instructor: Lucas Senger
Time: R 2:00-3:50 PM

This seminar is designed to provide students with a practical working knowledge of essential financial concepts and practices. Topics such as resource management/budgeting, career planning including employment basics, investing and what credit scores mean and how they are applicable a student’s financial life. Students will be linked with College, University and personal resource providers that can support the unique challenges that first year students face.


Society/Lit: (FYE)
Class: ENG 238
CRN: 41343
Instructor: Tony Prichard
Time: MWF 1:00-2:20 PM

Can humans think of intelligent life in non-anthropomorphic ways? In this course we will examine three of the other intelligences that literature has presented over the past century, specifically animal, artificial, and alien. We will explore the ways that these literary encounters with the “non-human” both shape and reshape the human and the concept of humankind itself. Anders, Charlie Jane. Victories Greater Than Death Morton, Timothy. Humankind: Solidarity with Non-Human People. Okorafor, Nnedi. Lagoon. VanderMeer, Jeff. Borne. Wells, Martha. All Systems Red Wyndam, John. Chocky


Designing a Life You Love
Class: SMNR 385
Instructor: Molly Ware
Time: R 4:00-5:50 PM

In times of so much uncertainty, isolation and information overload, we need new ways of navigating life outside of traditional approaches to planning for the future. In this course, we will explore content and practice skills that help you live life on purpose and design your life in ways that create a deep sense of meaning and fulfillment especially in times of transition (like graduation or your first years at college). Learn to stop going through the motions of life, stop playing by everyone else's rules and start creating the life you want even when you're not sure what that is or what step to take next. Find your way through the overwhelming array of choices with ease. And learn research-based practices for noticing and reducing stress so it stops driving your life making it hard to experience joy, connection, and satisfaction no matter what your life looks like in the moment. This course will be highly experiential and provide opportunities for you to immediately apply course principles to your life.


Winter Quarter

Visionary Worlds Film Series
Class: SMNR 197B
Instructor: Tania Douglas

This two-credit course is a text and film study focused on themes of social justice, race, class, and identity to name a few. Using speculative fiction and a variety of films, we will engage in broadening our understanding of the intersectional and visionary themes of social justice as presented in the realms of sci-fi, drama, and fantasy. Science fiction, in particular, offers a rich context within which we can dream up and imagine alternate realities, new ways of being, and the future of humanity. Paired with critical dialogue about current events and social movements, and films exploring contemporary issues of race and social order, we will explore different perspectives, identities, and visionary ideas to help us understand ourselves and our world more deeply.


Creative Identity & Industry
Class: AECI 397A
Instructor: Lucas Senger

This course is designed to help students explore and understand the creative identity as professional persona, consider creative practice as study and profession, and to identify academic pathways into creative industry. The course will feature regular visits from current professionals in the creative fields (design, technology, film, publishing, music and the arts). Students will also familiarize themselves with contemporary frameworks for spurring the creative self with a focus on Design Thinking.


Financial Literacy II
Class: SMNR 197B
Instructor: Lucas Senger

A Primer for a Lifetime of Investing: This seminar is designed to provide a practical working knowledge of basic investing concepts. Students will be linked with College, University and personal resource providers that can support the unique challenges that first year students face. All FIG seminars offer an exploration of academic content and essential questions within the liberal arts and sciences tradition.


Designing a Life You Love
Class: SMNR 385
Instructor: Molly Ware

In times of so much uncertainty, isolation and information overload, we need new ways of navigating life outside of traditional approaches to planning for the future. In this course, we will explore content and practice skills that help you live life on purpose and design your life in ways that create a deep sense of meaning and fulfillment especially in times of transition (like graduation or your first years at college). Learn to stop going through the motions of life, stop playing by everyone else's rules and start creating the life you want even when you're not sure what that is or what step to take next. Find your way through the overwhelming array of choices with ease. And learn research-based practices for noticing and reducing stress so it stops driving your life making it hard to experience joy, connection, and satisfaction no matter what your life looks like in the moment. This course will be highly experiential and provide opportunities for you to immediately apply course principles to your life.


Spring Quarter

Designing a Life You Love
Class: SMNR 385
Instructor: Molly Ware

In times of so much uncertainty, isolation and information overload, we need new ways of navigating life outside of traditional approaches to planning for the future. In this course, we will explore content and practice skills that help you live life on purpose and design your life in ways that create a deep sense of meaning and fulfillment especially in times of transition (like graduation or your first years at college). Learn to stop going through the motions of life, stop playing by everyone else's rules and start creating the life you want even when you're not sure what that is or what step to take next. Find your way through the overwhelming array of choices with ease. And learn research-based practices for noticing and reducing stress so it stops driving your life making it hard to experience joy, connection, and satisfaction no matter what your life looks like in the moment. This course will be highly experiential and provide opportunities for you to immediately apply course principles to your life.


Excursions to Creative Industries & Institutions
Class: SMNR 197B
Instructor: Lucas Senger

Immersion in creative institutions and places of creative production are essential to informing a thriving student creative practice. In this seminar we will explore what is possible in creative industry by experiencing community cultural hubs, creative companies in tech and entertainment, and artists’ studios. Granting students a first-hand opportunity to engage creative place.


Alien Perspectives Film Series
Class: SMNR 197B
Instructor: Tania Douglas

This two-credit course is a text and film study focused on themes of social justice and “the other”, as well as issues of race, class, intersectionality, and identity to name a few. We exist in a world culture rooted in the idea of “the other”, which is the foundation for most of our trials and tribulations. Is it possible for “the other” not to exist? Should that be our goal? What are the positives and negatives of seeing ourselves as different from other people in all the ways we do? Using science fiction paired with critical dialogue about current events and social movements, and films exploring contemporary issues of race and social order, we will explore different perspectives, identities, and visionary ideas to help us understand ourselves and our world more deeply.